in

WHO confirms that one million daily cases have already been exceeded in one day | Society | USA Edition

The World Health Organization (WHO) today updated its most recent statistics on the COVID-19 pandemic and admitted that on January 10, the million daily cases of this disease were exceeded for the first time, which already accumulates 90.7 million infections in a pandemic year.

In the last 24 hours, a lower number of positives was registered, close to 600,000, but the curve shows that the second wave of coronavirus in continents such as Europe or America continues without reaching a ceiling, despite the start of vaccination campaigns in many countries .

The deaths registered in the last 24 hours amounted to more than 12,000, bringing the total in the pandemic to 1.96 million; in this case, the record for daily deaths was reached on January 9, with more than 15,000 worldwide.

By region, WHO statistics indicate that America has crossed the barrier of 40 million infections, Europe is close to 30 million and South Asia, the third most affected area on the planet, exceeds 12 million.

However, their graphs show different trends, since in America there was an increase in daily cases this week, in Europe some stability has been maintained and in South Asia there is a slow but continuous decline from the peak reached in September.

America is also the region with the most deaths in the pandemic (932,000), followed by Europe (642,000) and South Asia (189,000).

In the data by countries, the US continues to stand out as the most affected territory, with 22 million positives and a curve still on the rise, followed by India (10 million), Brazil (8.1 million) and Russia (3.4 million) .

Here are four Western European countries with very diverse trends: the United Kingdom seems to finally drop its daily cases after an exponential rise in recent weeks, France and Italy remain stable, and Spain shows a worrying upward trend, with figures close to November records.

Recovered patients in the world number 66 million, and of the 24 million active cases, 0.5 percent (112,000) are in serious or critical condition.