2.4 million people& nbsp; worldwide causing various symptoms ranging from fever and dry cough to & nbsp;temporary loss of smell and taste. Now, experts in the world of dermatology are warning of a possible new symptom of the virus that may have gone unnoticed before: an inflammation of the blood vessels in the hands and feet that has been dubbed “COVID fingers”.” Data-reactid = “23”> The coronavirus has already infected more than 2.4 million people worldwide causing various symptoms ranging from fever and dry cough to temporary loss of smell and taste. Now, Experts in the world of dermatology warn of a possible new symptom of the virus that may have gone unnoticed before: an inflammation of the blood vessels in the hands and feet that has been dubbed “COVID fingers.”

Please note that there are COVID skin symptoms. Purple-red papules on the fingers and toes. It looks like chilblains. The patient may not have other symptoms of COVID. It is seen in young people.
Images of chilblains-like conditions caused by COVID-19 from Italy @TamarPedsRheum @NataliaVasCan @IreneBlancoMD

Characterized by a reddish-blue discoloration of the extremities, the condition is proving to predominate particularly among children. Amy Paller, MD and chair of the Department of Dermatology at Northwest University Feinberg School of Medicine, says that in the past two weeks, dermatologists around the world have begun to observe a significant influx of patients with this condition. .

Yahoo Life. “We are hearing about many cases that appear in clinics across the country (…) Every day I speak to a colleague who is caring for a patient.” “Data-reactid =” 29 “>” We are having something like a small epidemic in the world of dermatology with the ‘COVID fingers’, especially among boys between the ages of 10 and 20, “Paller explained to Yahoo Life.” We are hearing about many cases that appear in clinics across the country (…) Every One day I speak to a colleague who is caring for a patient. “

Since cases of this unexpected new symptom keep popping up, here’s what you should know about it.

The technical term for the disease is erythema pernio

definite& nbsp; by the National Institutes of Health as a “itchy and / or tenderness or reddish or purplish bumps that appear in reaction to the cold.” The bumps usually appear within a few hours of exposure to low temperatures, and those bumps can lead to more painful skin reactions such as “blisters, pustules, scabs, and ulcers.” Fewer than 200,000 cases are recorded in the United States each year. “Data-reactid =” 33 “> Pernio is the Latin word for” cold burn “and is a disease defined by the National Institutes of Health as” itching and / or or sensitivity or reddish or purplish bumps that appear as a reaction to the cold. ”The bumps usually appear within a few hours of exposure to low temperatures, and these bumps can lead to more painful skin reactions such as“ blisters, pustules, scabs. and ulcers. ”In the United States, fewer than 200,000 cases are recorded each year.

eating disorders,& nbsp;celiac disease, & nbsp;viral hepatitis& nbsp; and HIV. Huang says we shouldn’t link it to other coronaviruses. “Data-reactid =” 34 “>” It occurs in people who are healthy, but can sometimes appear with autoimmune diseases, better known as lupus, “says Huang. The condition may be caused due to various diseases, including eating disorders, celiac disease, viral hepatitis and HIV, Huang says that we should not link it with other coronaviruses.

Normally appears during the winter months

Part of the strange nature of the current “mini epidemic” of chilblains among children, according to Paller, is the moment in which it is taking place. “Chilblains show up in those of us who live in northern winter climates in January or February,” says Paller. “It is a cold-induced phenomenon in which the blood vessels in those areas (…) such as the fingers and toes will be prone to spasm in those peripheral vessels.”

“It is an inflammation around the blood vessels, a type of response to low temperatures,” adds Huang. “It usually happens during the winter, or if someone doesn’t wear the right clothes when they go outdoors, those bumps will come out and they will usually go away in a week or two.”

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Treatment usually focuses on keeping limbs warm

This condition usually subsides on its own, but Huang and Paller say that “in addition to heat” certain medications can be used to reduce irritation. “We often treat it by addressing the discomfort it creates and trying to dilate the vessels with medications that increase blood pressure, such as nifedipine,” says Paller. “And of course, in this situation, you have to try to keep your hands and feet warm.” With COVID-19, which could be causing this condition without the need for freezing temperatures, it’s more complicated. “You know, our usual technique of keeping warm probably won’t do much good in this case,” adds Paller.

Could be an indication of asymptomatic COVID-19 patients

The first cases of chilblains in children with COVID-19 were recorded in Italy in late March, where the development of painful blisters and red sores was observed. That’s a large part of the reason why American dermatologists suspect a possible link between the sudden increase in this condition and COVID-19. “Generally, these are perfectly healthy children with mild symptoms, and frankly, since some of these tests are still difficult to access, we don’t know for sure if they have COVID-19,” says Paller. “So I think we will find out much more next week or in two months.”

“Last week, I will have seen about five patients who had it (…) So there is something there,” says Huang. “We think that it is associated with COVID-19 and we think that they are asymptomatic carriers (…) Or that it could be part of a phase of convalescence in which you have COVID-19 but you will develop symptoms later (…) We are treating to test them. “