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#Video Orchestra teacher intubated by COVID-19 plays the violin to thank medical personnel

Grover Wilhelmsen, who was on a ventilator for COVID-19, played his violin in gratitude to medical personnel who treated him

Grover wilhelmsen, a 70-year-old retired orchestra teacher who was connected to a ventilator after getting sick from COVID-19, played his violin to thank the medical staff of the McKay-Dee Hospital in Ogden, Utah.

Wilhelmsen asked the nurse who attended to him if he could play the violin as a way of thanking the medical staff who daily fight to combat the pandemic.

“I told him, ‘We’d love to hear you play, it would bring a lot of brightness and positivity to our environment,’” said nurse Ciara Sase.

When the hospital board approved his request, Wilhelmsen’s wife brought her husband’s violin to the intensive care unit.

Tears welled up in my eyes, because seeing a patient doing that while intubated was amazing. Even though he was so sick, he managed to play for us, ”said Sase.

The nurse Matt harper, who watched Wilhelmsen’s concert, expressed that seeing him play was a symbol of hope in times of calamity and sadness.

“It was shocking to be there when he took up the violin. I felt like I was in a dream because I am used to patients feeling miserable or sedated while intubated. Grover turned an unfortunate situation into something positive. This was by far one of my favorite memories in an ICU, ”he said.

Orchestra teacher intubated by COVID-19 plays the violin to thank medical personnel. Photo McKay-Dee Hospital

At hospital all rooms have glass doors that are kept closed, but the nurse sase decided to turn on a loudspeaker so that other patients could hear the melodies of Wilhelmsen.

“A dozen of our staff gathered to hear him play. It was a great moment. The songs included the Tennessee waltz and many hymns played in churches, ”he added.

Wilhelmsen performed melodies for several hours two days in a row before becoming more ill and requiring sedation.

“I told him how grateful we were and how much what he did meant. It was the least he could do. He replied: ‘I do it for you because everyone is sacrificing a lot to take care of me,’ ”Sase said.

Nurse Sase, who was in the care of Wilhelmsen the time he was hospitalized, he affirmed that it has been one of the experiences that has given him the most in his entire professional life.

Orchestra teacher intubated by COVID-19 plays the violin to thank medical personnel. Photo McKay-Dee Hospital

“When I started crying in the room after he finished playing, he wrote to me: ‘Stop crying. Just smile, ‘and then he smiled at me. It is something that will always be in my heart and will stay with me for the rest of my career, “he confessed.

Wilhelmsen He was discharged on November 10 and taken to another care center, where his family is confident that he can make a full recovery.

His wife, Diana, says he is too weak to play, but when he regains strength he will take his fiddle and he will return to his great passion which is music.

With information from López-Dóriga Digital