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Trump doubts whether the Supreme Court would listen to his electoral challenge as he runs out of options

FILE PHOTO: US President Donald Trump makes a brief appearance in Brady's press conference room at the White House in Washington, United States, on November 24, 2020. REUTERS / Hannah McKay / File Photo FILE PHOTO: US President Donald Trump makes a brief appearance in Brady’s press conference room at the White House in Washington, United States, on November 24, 2020. REUTERS / Hannah McKay / File Photo

By Linda So and Raphael Satter

WASHINGTON, Nov 29 (.) – US President Donald Trump on Sunday questioned whether the Supreme Court will ever hear a case reflecting his unsubstantiated allegations of widespread voter fraud, while senior Republicans said a transition to the presidency of Joe Biden seems to be inevitable.

Trump’s comments in a telephone interview with Fox News Channel suggested growing resignation to the results of the Nov. 3 election that handed the White House over to his Democratic opponent Biden, and follow another blow suffered by the Republican president’s team. .

Ballot counts in Wisconsin’s two largest counties ended Sunday, confirming that Biden won the disputed state by more than 20,000 votes.

Missouri Republican Senator Roy Blunt said he and other high-ranking lawmakers expect Biden to be sworn in as president on Jan. 20.

“We are working with the Biden administration, the likely administration, on both the transition and the inauguration. We are moving forward,” Blunt said on CNN’s “State of the Union,” though he did not acknowledge that Trump lost.

Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson is one of the few Republicans to refer to Biden as president-elect.

“The transition is the important thing. President Trump’s words are not that significant,” Hutchinson told “Fox News Sunday.”

Trump used his interview on Fox News Channel’s “Sunday Morning Futures” to repeat the accusations he has made without evidence of widespread voter fraud. }

His campaign and his legal team have lost dozens of lawsuits by failing to convince judges of electoral irregularities in states like Michigan, Georgia, Arizona and Nevada, all critical of Biden’s victory.

Trump was unclear about what legal steps he will take now.

“The problem is that it is difficult to take it to the Supreme Court,” Trump said, without clarifying whether he thought the highest court would refuse to hear an appeal or whether his campaign could not even file one.

Biden won the presidential election with 306 Electoral College votes, many more than the 270 required, compared to 232 for Trump. Biden also led Trump by more than 6 million individual votes.

(Reporting by Linda So and Raphael Satter; Additional reporting by Jarrett Renshaw, Tim Ahmann and Andrea Shalal; written by Lisa Shumaker. Edited in Spanish by Rodrigo Charme)