The professional listed the smartest dogs after surveying and consulting more than 200 canine obedience judges (Shutterstock)

Stanley Coren is a canine psychologist and professor at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. He is the author of the book The Intelligence of Dogs, where he explains theories about intelligence and the ability of dogs to learn new orders and obey them.

In his work, in addition, lists the smartest dogs after surveying and consulting over 200 canine obedience judges. These are the smartest races:

Category 1

From 1 to 10 are the races with the highest intelligence and obedience possibilities. They require less practice than others to understand their owners’ new orders. According to Coren’s book, these respond to the first order by 95%. They are quick to respond and learn quickly by being trained by coaches who are not necessarily professional.

1. Border Collie

The Border Collie is one of the smartest dog breeds chosen by the judges almost unanimously (Shutterstock.com)

2. Poodle

According to the specialist, the breed excels in obedience and is one of the easiest puppies to train (Shutterstock.com)

3. German shepherd

They are one of the brightest dog breeds that have not only forcibly served, but have also helped as healthcare partners and even therapy dogs (Shutterstock.com)

4. Golden retriever

They can learn over 200 commands and are one of the most trusted companions (Shutterstock.com)

5. Doberman

Known for their fearless nature, speed, and deep endurance (Shutterstock.com)

6. Shetland Sheepdog

They are very easy to train and generally feature prominently in agility competitions (Shutterstock.com)

7. Labrador retriever

Some of the common lab jobs are being a guide dog (Shutterstock.com)

8. Papillon

They are one of the most beloved pets by obedience judges (Shutterstock.com)

9. Rottweiler

This breed is known for its patience, courage and great insight (Shutterstock.com)

10. Australian Cattle Shepherd

Known for its agility, it is often a great help to humans in their daily activities (Shutterstock.com)

Category 2

The book clarifies that in general they respond to the first order 85% of the time, but for more complex orders they need more time to focus.

They learn simple and easy commands after 5 and 15 repetitions of each exercise. They remember them easily but as they practice they improve. The book clarifies that in general they respond to the first order 85% of the time, but for more complex orders they need more time to focus.

11. Welsh Corgi

12. Miniature Schnauzer

13. Springer spaniel

14. Belgian Shepherd Tervueren

15. Belgian Shepherd

16. Wolfspitz

17. German Shorthaired Pointer

18. Cocker spaniel

19. Breton Spaniel

20. Nova Scotia Retriever

21. Weimaraner

22. Belgian Shepherd Malinois

23. Pomeranian

24. Irish Water Dog

25. Hungarian Shorthaired Pointer

26. Welsh Corgi Cardigan

Category 3

They tend to respond 70% the first time, but unlike previous breeds, they have some insecurity in the response.

The breeds that make up this third category are dogs that need between 15 and 30 repetitions to learn an exercise. They have the ability to retain once the order has been learned. They tend to respond 70% the first time, but unlike previous breeds, they have some insecurity in the response.

27. Yorkshire terrier

28. Giant Schnauzer

29. Airedale terrier

30. Shepherd of Brie

31. Welsh Springer Spaniel

32. Manchester terrier

33. Samoyed

34. American Staffordshire terrier

35. Irish setter

36. Norwegian moose hunter

37. English setter

38. Norwich Terrier

39. Dalmatian

Category 4

They respond to the first 50% of the time and the effectiveness depends a lot on the hours of practice.

They need 25 to 40 repetitions to fully understand an exercise. If they do not repeat the exercises frequently they will remember the orders with difficulty. They respond to the first 50% of the time and effectiveness depends a lot on the hours of practice. The speed of response is slower. The greater the distance the dog’s response will be less consistent and predictable.

40. Bedlington terrier

41. Irish Wolfhound

42. Kuvasz

43. Pointer

44. German shorthaired pointer.

45. Siberian Husky

46. ​​Greyhound

47. West Highland white terrier

48. Boxer

49. Dachshund

50. Alaskan malamute

51. Shar-pei

52. Rhodesian crested

53. Irish Terrier

54. Boston Terrier

Category 5

They will respond to the first order 30% of the time. They work best if the owner is close to them

They need 40 to 80 repetitions to get an acceptable performance. They will respond to the first order 30% of the time. They work best if the owner is close to them. These dogs seem distracted most of the time. They are not suitable races for first-time owners.

55. Skye Terrier

56. Norfolk Terrier

57. Pug

58. French Bulldog

59. Maltese terrier

60. Italian Greyhound

61. Chinese crested

62. Tibetan Terrier

63. English Shepherd or Bobtail

64. Pyrenean Mountain Dog

65. Scottish Terrier

66. Bullterrier

67. Chihuahua

68. Lhasa Apso

69. Bullmastiff

Category 6

It is estimated that they need between 30 and 40 repetitions for a first understanding of the new order.

And finally, in this category are the races with functional intelligence and lower obedience. It is estimated that they need between 30 and 40 repetitions for a first understanding of the new order. The response by these races is slow and uneven. In percentage, less than 25% usually react to the first order.

70. Shin Tzu

71. Basset hound

72. Mastiff

73. Pekingese

74. Bloodhound

75. Borzoi

76. Chow chow

77. Bulldog

78. Basenji

79. Afghan hound

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