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The Australian added his second consecutive victory after the one achieved in Jerez

05/16/2021 at 3:08 PM CEST

Nil Banos

From suffering a little in the first weekends of this start of the year to finding oneself in a very sweet moment. Not even the tremendous downpour that fell on Le Mans during the first stage of the race did not remove that good taste in his mouth. In fact, those track and weather conditions gave it a setting that the Australian loves.

Jack Miller posted his second straight win of the season. Two wins in a row signed by an Australian driver, something that has not happened since Casey Stoner achieved it in 2012. Sensational performance of the ’43’ of the Ducati Lenovo Team that reminded a bit of that race that took place at Assen in 2016, when he achieved his first victory in the premier class. He could not even with his momentum the double ‘long lap penalty’ that he had to face after going faster than he should in the pit lane at the time of entering to change bikes.

“It was extremely hectic. Now towards the end of the race it was quite calm but at the beginning with the rain and the wind I saw some barriers fall. I thought they were going to raise the red flag”, snapped the Australian from the Ducati Lenovo Team in the parc fermé. “Afterwards I had to do the double ‘long lap’, I think that for spending a bit with speed, sometimes I get fined for that kind of thing”said good old Miller with a smile on his face.

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After his comeback and put in first position, Jack commented that what he tried was “stay on the bike” and that even though I had thought “even trying to get back into the pit lane to change bikes” saw that his distance “Regarding Johann, he was quite big and I looked good”. No one could take Jack’s smile and joy from him after adding his second consecutive victory of the course.

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