Two astronauts walk on the moon recording everything they meet. In this video from more than two decades ago, the details were barely distinguishable, without color and with 12 fps, until artificial intelligence had done its “magic” and remastered it with 4K resolution.

The use of artificial intelligence is infinite, there are many sectors that have found support in this technology to be more efficient and achieve previously impossible goals. Even the world of cinema and entertainment benefits from artificial intelligence.

Thanks to this technology, YouTube is being filled with video remasters from the last century. Videos as relevant as those recorded by the first NASA missions on the Moon. With this technology they edit the color, the sound and convert a 16mm video interpolated from 12 to 60fps and 4K resolution.

The Dutchsteammachine channel, among others, are dedicating themselves to rescuing classic NASA videos to bring them back to life. Scenes like this one of the astronauts John Young and Charles Duke walking on the lunar surface have been remastered thanks to this technology. in the original version the details were blurry, colorless and the sound was out of sync with the scene.

Those responsible for this restoration have resorted to DAIN-AI model, popular for this type of task, and they have achieved an amazing result. Every detail that appears in front of the camera is seen with definition and the colors are quite respectful of reality. A unthinkable video quality at that time when the astronauts of the Apollo 16 mission were to retransmit and record every step they took on the moon.

NASA archives are the most popular on many channels, but they are not the only ones. In others like that of Denis Shiryaev we found jewels as engraved images in Japan of 1913 and 1915 when its inhabitants still wore kimonos on the street and those vestments were mixed with the military uniforms of the soldiers of the First World War.

Artificial intelligence dares even with older videos. They are videos recorded by the Lumière brothers in the streets of Paris from 1890 where now we can distinguish the details of women’s dresses with much more definition.

Channels like Guy Jones’, in addition to giving them color, have had to slow down the footage to 60 frames per second, reconstruct the faces of the people in the videos and add the ambient sound that the original recording did not have.