Perseverance and Ingenuity take a selfie on Mars before the first helicopter flight on the red planet

Perseverance and Ingenuity take a selfie on Mars before the helicopter's first flight on the red planet

Selfi of the Perseverance rover next to the small Ingenuity helicopter.EUROPA PRESS

The image distributed by NASA is made up of 62 photographs taken by the rover of the Martian mission

NASA’s Perseverance rover on Mars used a camera on the end of his robotic arm to take this photo of himself with the Ingenuity helicopter near.

The picture, prelude to the first flight of a motorized aircraft in another world, was taken about 4 meters away in this April 6 image using a camera called WATSON (Wide Angle Topographic Sensor for Operations and Engineering), part of the SHERLOC (Raman and Luminescence Scanning of Habitable Environments for Organic and Chemical Substances) instrument. ), located at the end of the rover’s robotic arm.

Perseverance’s selfie with Ingenuity joined from 62 individual images Taken while the rover was looking at the helicopter, and then again while looking at the WATSON camera, NASA reports.

Once the team is ready to attempt the first flight, scheduled for no earlier than April 11, Perseverance will receive and transmit final flight instructions from mission controllers to Ingenuity. Several factors will determine the precise time for flight, including modeling of local wind patterns reported by measurements taken by the MEDA (Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer) instrument aboard Perseverance.

Ingenuity will run its rotors at 2,537 rpm And, if all the final self-tests look good, it will take off. After ascending at a speed of approximately 1 meter per second, the helicopter will fly at 3 meters above the surface for 30 seconds. Then Ingenuity will descend and touch the Martian surface again.

Several hours after the first flight has occurred, Perseverance will download Ingenuity’s first engineering dataset and possibly images and video from the rover’s navigation cameras and Mastcam-Z, a pair of zoom cameras. From data downloaded that first night after the flight, the Ingenuity team hopes to determine whether their first attempt to fly to Mars was a success.