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Norman Lloyd dies at 106: actor, director, producer and Hollywood history

A Hollywood legend has died at 106: Norman Lloyd. His representative has reported that the actor died at his home in Los Angeles while he was sleeping. Lloyd worked throughout the years as an actor, director and producer, and he is one of those people who could spend days talking about the ins and outs of the industryas he worked with the most prestigious filmmakers of yesterday and today.

Norman Lloyd was part of the Mercury Theater by Orson Welles, who gave him a role in ‘Citizen Kane’ that he ended up leaving when Welles had to cut budget. He would have to wait for his big screen debut in Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Sabotage (The Lonely Woman)’, in which he played Frank Fry, one of his most iconic roles. With the master of suspense he would return to work on ‘Alfred Hitchcock presents’ as director of several of the episodes. Hitchcock came to her rescue at a time when Hollywood was hunting down suspected communists.

On television he found the role for which he will be remembered by the American public: he played Dr. Daniel Aschlander in all six seasons of ‘St. Elsewhere ‘, a thirteen Emmy Award-winning series. Lloyd was nominated for two Emmys for ‘The Name of the Game’ and ‘Steambath’.

Working up to 100 years

He became a prolific producer, director, and actor in film, television, and theater. He did not stop working until 2015, the year in which he released his last film, ‘And suddenly you’ with Amy Schumer. At the age of 90, he was still playing tennis regularly. We have seen him in ‘The Age of Innocence’, ‘The Dead Poets Club’, ‘Star Trek: The Next Generation’, ‘In His Shoes’ and ‘Modern Family’, to speak of some of his latest roles. The city of Los Angeles declared November 8, his birthday, as Norman Lloyd Day. With him goes a piece of Hollywood history, from the Star System to the present day.

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