Joanna Hoffman, who for several years was the Steve Jobs right hand, criticized Facebook for destroying the fabric of human relations. In a participation during the CogX 2020 conference, the former Apple employee said that Facebook destroys the very fabric of democracy and “sells an addictive drug called anger

Hoffman, who built a faultless reputation at Apple and is the architect of the Macintosh’s success, lashed out at the platform. While Jobs’ ex-colleague has a respect for what Facebook has accomplished, she doesn’t know if they are “really ignorant or motivated by something darker what it seems like”.

The criticism arises after Facebook refuses to delete Donald Trump’s comments. After being removed on Twitter for inciting violence, Mark Zuckerberg gave the green light to the US president. to continue publishing on the platform. With the apology of not censuring to ensure freedom of expression, the person in charge of Facebook bothered more than one, including his employees.

Now it is Joanna Hoffman who exposes her point of view during a panel with ex-colleagues from Apple and General Magic, two companies where she worked during her successful career in the 80s and 90s.

“We know that anger is addictive, we know that we can attract people to our platform and make a compromise if we miss them enough. So what, should we capitalize on that every time?”

Hoffman said that leadership is extremely important and that people make a big difference for a company. “Without a leader who brings it all together, in the end nothing really generates productive results,” he says.

Facebook won’t change its stance on Trump hate comments

Despite criticism from activists and the public, Facebook has no interest in changing its stance to stop harmful content on the social network. Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan responded to criticism sent by scientists to their foundation earlier this month.

They both say they are upset by Donald Trump’s incendiary and divisive rhetoric, although they do not offer a forceful answer to it. Zuckerberg and Chan say their foundation and Facebook are separate entities, and that the company’s policies will not affect charity work.

The hate generates clicks and these produce more money through ads. This strategy is also exploited on platforms such as YouTube where controversial or incendiary content is the best positioned and has the most views. Despite the rhetoric of the executives, the truth is that this strategy is far from disappearing.