in

It looks like a sitcom about a video game studio, but this Apple TV + series goes much further

It is logical to think that ‘Mythic Quest’ is a spinoff of that sitcom that has already become a classic in its own right, ‘The Office’, but the truth is that without detracting from that monument to comedy in the least, this Apple TV + series that has just finished its second season has its own personality. Although the setting is comparable, certain humor resources as well and some characters are definitely inspired by the desktop fauna of that one.

But ‘Mythic Quest’ takes office life only as a starting point. It is true that the ridiculous power struggles, labor exploitation and empty lives beyond the four walls of the cubicle they get their corresponding (and sometimes quite bitter) satire. But, especially in the narrative, ‘Mythic Quest’ goes beyond the portrait of the day-to-day development of a game. In fact, this second season confirms what he had previously dropped.

We had clues that ‘Mythic Quest’ was a slightly untamed beast already in its first season, with that exhibition of creativity and breaking of the unwritten rules of the comedy series that was ‘Silent and Dark Death’, its fifth episode: a kind of origin story that did not reveal its secret until the end and that worked independently from the rest of the series. Not very necessary to enjoy the other episodes of the season, but it certainly changed the viewer’s attitude: from then on, anything could happen.

However, the series was also aware that it was building its lore with more than just fireworks castles: He returned to portray life in the offices of ‘Mythic Quest’, but the viewers were no longer the same. From ‘Silent and Dark Death’ we were more aware of how well profiled the characters were, how sincere the dramatic moments were and the bile residue left by each joke. Which left us in the perfect frame of mind for a second season that rounds out the experiment.

Two expansions and quite a few science fiction books

The second season of ‘Mythic Quest’ tells, on its surface, how Poppy and Ian (Charlotte Nicdao and Rob McElhenney, great as always) share the creative work for an expansion of ‘Feast of Crows’. But that’s not all: the two testers start a relationship and, in an episode reminiscent of the ‘Silent and Dark Death’ dynamic, we will learn about the enigmatic past of one of the best characters in the series, one that grows episode by episode.

But ‘Mythic Quest’ goes further, and aware of the iconic power of this isolated episode, is succeeded by another who brings what is there to the present, giving it much more dramatic entity. The result is two absolutely magnificent pieces, set outside the office, and which launch to the viewer, with simplicity and honesty, a series of valuable ideas about pure creativity and the industry that is generated around it. All with settings that will delight fans, such as the writing of ‘Amazing Stories’, and glorious characters like Isaac Asimov.

'Mythic Quest', review: an essential comedy for video game fans, halfway between 'The Office' and 'Silicon Valley'

And not only that: perhaps going back to the two special episodes that preceded the second season, one of them shot during confinement and in videoconference format, this year also includes an excellent episode on a single stage. With one of the funniest storylines of the season, too: an employee personality test whose results not everyone is willing to sign.

In general, ‘Mythic Quest’ moves away from the video game development process, mainly because It is a theme that already exploded excellently in the first season, with the whole theme of the shovel or the magnificent episode of the Nazis. Here it is more important to delve into the characters (also splendid Jo -Jessie Ennis, in a superb twist to the grotesque- or his new boss Brad -Danny Pudi-) and reflect on creativity. Without stopping to delve into this superb and detestable cast of digital egomaniacs.

The best games in the Steam summer sale

The revelation Piero Hincapié, in the orbit of Betis and Atlético de Madrid