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Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities, Keys to Achieving Biodiversity Goals

If the rights and decision-making capacity of indigenous peoples and local communities are not fully recognized in biodiversity management, the policies established by the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) could be insufficient. effective. This is supported by an international study led by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Autonomous University of Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) and recently published in the journal Ambio.

The authors consider that the framework still has a long way to go towards the full recognition of the rights and capacities of indigenous peoples.

Currently, the Convention on Biological Diversity is working to formulate the objectives that will frame global biodiversity policy in the years to come. This will be carried out through an ambitious international plan known as the Global Biodiversity Framework post 2020. Its objective is to promote a profound transformation at the social level that will make it possible to stop the loss of biodiversity on a global scale.

However, the authors consider that, unfortunately, the framework as currently drafted still has a long way to go towards full recognition of the Rights and the capacity of indigenous peoples and local communities.

“The understanding of nature by indigenous peoples and local communities aligns perfectly with the vision of the Convention on Biological Diversity of living in harmony with nature,” explains ICREA research professor at ICTA-UAB Victoria Reyes-Garcia, study leader. “It seems paradoxical that global discussions about the collective future of the planet don’t listen to the voices of indigenous peoples and local communities, one of the stakeholder groups that has contributed the most to safeguard the biodiversity of the Earth ”.

Rights and decision-making capacity of peoples

The study, signed by 21 scientists from around the world, presents a series of arguments by which putting the rights and decision-making capacity of indigenous peoples and local communities in the foreground is essential for the success of the future global policy of biodiversity. Based on an in-depth review of the literature, the work highlights that indigenous peoples and local communities possess fundamental knowledge to establish realistic, legitimate and effective biodiversity goals.

The work highlights that indigenous peoples and local communities possess fundamental knowledge to establish realistic, legitimate and effective biodiversity objectives.

“The Global Biodiversity Framework must recognize and address the views and perspectives of Indigenous Peoples and local communities,” he says. Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares, co-author of the study and researcher at the University of Helsinki. “There is clear evidence that their knowledge systems, practices and values ​​have much to offer in addressing the current biodiversity crisis.”

The authors argue that the participation of these peoples and communities in biodiversity policy contributes to recognizing and defending human rights, and they ask the Convention on Biological Diversity to fully recognize them, not only as stakeholders, but also as holders of rights. , knowledge and decision-making capacity.

Reference:

Reyes-García, V., et al. (2021). “Recognizing Indigenous Peoples ‘and local communities’ rights and agency in the post-2020 biodiversity agenda”. Ambio.

Rights: Creative Commons.

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