French citizens have exhibited through social networks the long lines that people have made and that do not respect social distancing

By: Web Writing

Paris.- France The de-escalation process began on Monday, very progressive, with a particular focus on public transport and the new law on health emergencies still pending entry into force for legal reasons.

One of the sectors where they are most noticing these limitations is transportation, where workers need a certificate from their company to use public transportation.

From this Monday it is mandatory in France wear a mask on public transport and also at stations, just as it is compulsory in Paris to have a company certificate that justifies using it during rush hours, although law enforcement agencies are instructed not to impose the expected fines for the first few days , of 135 euros.

This progressive return to normality occurs after France will register this Sunday 70 deaths from coronavirus, its lowest daily number since the beginning of the lockdown, up to a total of 26,380 deceased.

The distancing rules were not followed at many points in the stations, or inside some local trains, as recognized by the Minister of Health, Olivier VĂ©ran, in an interview with the channel “BFMTV.

General view of rue Porte Dijeaux, one of Bordeaux’s main shopping streets in Bordeaux, France, May 11, 2020.

However, through social networks, French citizens have criticized the people who went to shops departmental before they opened their doors and making long rows to enter.

They regretted that they are not complying with the sanitation measures to prevent the spread of Covid-19, such as keeping the minimum one-meter distance between people.

“The French are Latinos and as soon as they are left free … This can be complicated,” mused an employee of one of the establishments on the avenue, who predicted a relaxation in the respect of the rules of social distancing.

USERS REACT WITH MEMES

Some users protested with the well-known memes about long rows of people who showed up in Paris to enter the shops departmental.