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Ferrari forced to change Leclerc engine and awaits penalty

The Monegasque driver was hit by Lance Stroll, who was not in control of his Aston Martin when he reached the apex of the first corner as a result of braking too late and hitting the grass in wet track conditions.

The collision seriously damaged the car of Leclerc and it was enough to kick him out of the grand prix at turn two.

However, the consequences of that incident do not end because Ferrari discovered that the power unit used by Leclerc could not be repaired.

This means that Leclerc will have to use his third and last power unit of the year in the Belgian Grand Prix, and that will likely mean having to use a fourth engine later in the season, which will translate into a grid penalty.

In a statement issued Tuesday, Ferrari said: “The examination of the SF21 number 16 carried out yesterday in Maranello, revealed that, in addition, the engine was irretrievably damaged and cannot be used again, this as a consequence of the impact of the Aston Martin of Lance Stroll ”.

“This is a new blow for Scuderia Ferrari and the Monegasque driver. This damage has a financial impact and also ramifications on the races given that, in the remaining 12 weekends of the season, it is very likely that the team will be forced. to mount a fourth combustion engine in Charles’s SF21, thus incurring grid penalties ”.

The damage to the Italian house’s rider’s engine comes after rival Red Bull also reported having suffered two possible breaks in the power unit as a result of the impact unleashed by Valtteri Bottas.

Max Verstappen’s power unit at the British GP suffered a crack, for which he had to be replaced for the Hungarian GP race, while Sergio Pérez’s power unit failed after he was rammed by Valtteri Bottas at the first corner of the Hungaroring.

Ferrari team principal Mattia Binotto suggested at the weekend that F1 could consider a rule change that would force rival teams to pay for accident damages if found to be entirely at fault.

While Red Bull thinks teams should be exempt from the cost cap if they suffer accidental damage caused by other teams, Binotto believes an alternative idea might work better.

“I think we could discuss in the near future with the other team directors, the FIA ​​and F1,” said Binotto.

“Obviously, if you are not guilty, having that damage with the budget ceiling is something that now has greater consequences.”

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“Should we add exemptions? I’m not sure that’s the solution because I think it would be very difficult to monitor.”

“But I think what we can consider is that if a driver is found guilty, that driver’s team should at least pay the other teams for damages and repairs. That will make the drivers more liable.”

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Arrancada Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes W12, Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB16B, Sergio Pérez, Red Bull Racing RB16B, Lando Norris, McLaren MCL35M, Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes W12, Charles Leclerc, Ferrari SF21

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Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari SF21, gets out of his damaged car

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari SF21, gets out of his damaged car

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Photo by: Zak Mauger / Motorsport Images

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari SF21, gets out of his damaged car

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari SF21, gets out of his damaged car

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Photo by: Zak Mauger / Motorsport Images

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari SF21 withdraws from the race

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari SF21 withdraws from the race

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Photo by: Zak Mauger / Motorsport Images

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari SF21 withdraws from the race

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari SF21 withdraws from the race

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Photo by: Zak Mauger / Motorsport Images

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari

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Photo by: Zak Mauger / Motorsport Images

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