For years it has been speculated that Facebook has been inspired by its competition to launch similar applications, functions or tools to offer its version to users or, in some cases, it chooses to buy from those companies.

We are talking about one of the most influential companies in the world, to give us an idea, it has revenues of more than 70 billion dollars a year (2019) of which more than 69 billion are from advertising; Among its four social platforms (FB, Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp) it has more than 6 billion accounts – and therefore exposure windows.

This has earned Facebook to be considered one of the 10 most valuable brands in the world, according to the Global 500 2020, Brand Finance is 79 thousand 804 million dollars, but the 2020 BrandZ Top 100 Global ranking, published by WPP and Kantar places it at 147,190 million dollars.

But, as it has grown, various questions have arisen around the Menlo Park company about how it has achieved its goals or the market share it has, many of them have been related by the inspiration or acquisition of its competition. .

Acknowledges, but denies anti-competitiveness

All this comes up because on Wednesday the CEOs of Google, Sundar Pichai; Apple, Tim Cook; Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg; and Amazon, Jeff Bezos, appeared before the House of Representatives antitrust subcommittee.

The reason, was a hearing in which questions were answered by legislators about digital competition and domination in their respective fields of action.

In this regard, the CEO of Facebook accepted something that everyone knew, but could not confirm that « it has certainly adapted characteristics that others have led. » This in response to a direct questioning about the acquisition of Instagram and a series of emails that allegedly reveal the intentions of buying the app in order to « move faster », to « prevent competitors from establishing themselves ».

However, Zuckerberg denied any characterization, alleging that Facebook used such tactics in an anti-competitive manner, according to a TechCrunch report.

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