Chris Terrio, writer of Justice League, suffered from depression due to changes to his script – Tomatazos

Zack Snyder’s Justice League – 82% is a film that has had a very long and complicated journey. No doubt about that. The failure involving Batman vs Superman: Dawn of Justice – 27% affected the reputation, within Warner, of Zack Snyder, but also of screenwriter Chris Terrio. They both came to work on their version of DC’s most iconic team of heroes in an overtly hostile environment. They were pressed so that the film had a lighter tone than the previous one. Study pressures affected Zack snyder, but that’s not what made him leave the project. That was achieved by a family tragedy: the suicide of his daughter Autumn.

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The departure of Zack snyder had the studio hire a director who had already worked with Marvel on The Avengers – 92% and Avengers: Age of Ultron – 75%: Joss Whedon. The Frankenstein that he gave to Warner was a loose mix of his style with what he had filmed Snyder; in other words, a movie with enormous tonal problems. Add to that a series of out of place jokes, macho scenes and jokes just for the sake of it, and a removal or reduction of scenes of characters played by people of color.

In a lengthy interview for Variety, the screenwriter Chris Terrio He talked about how excruciating this whole process was. He was asked how he felt when his affair was prematurely cut off with the departure of Snyder and the entrance of Whedon. What he revealed is that losing the play he had written affected him deeply to the degree of depression, but he did not feel entitled to be sad in light of the tragedy that the original director and his wife Deborah Snyder were going through:

Also read: Chris Terrio lashes out at critics who called Batman v Superman incoherent

I went into a deep depression when the film was taken and rewritten, but I didn’t even feel like I had the right to be depressed because Zack Y Debbie [Snyder, su esposa y coproductora] they were dealing with their family tragedy. Compared to that, losing the movie I had written seemed like a trifle, but it hurt. It hurt me knowing that I had cared so much for these characters and that I hadn’t worked on anything else for a long time.

As you can imagine, this feeling was still present when he was able to see the film and saw that his style was conspicuous by its absence. He felt that what he had in front of him was only a ghost of what could be, but that the study did not give him the opportunity to live:

When those personal touches were removed from the film in the 2017 version, I was quiet because I couldn’t really say anything, but of course it hurt. All that was left was the dinosaur skeleton of what had been a great and enormous beast. Maybe it was a big, unruly beast. It was obviously four hours long and it was maximalist and operatic and, yeah, a little crazy, but I think the movie is insane in the best sense.

He was also asked if the failure that was Justice League – 41% of Whedon It affected his reputation, but he said he cares more about how it affected him emotionally:

Sure. That affects your reputation, but more importantly it poisons your soul and your confidence, especially since there was this other version of the film that had not been seen.

It is not surprising that as we reported yesterday, all this, in addition to lowering his spirits, made him want to separate his name from the film:

I immediately called my lawyer and said, ‘I want to remove my name from the film.’ [El abogado] then he called Warner Bros. and told them he wanted to do that.

Unfortunately, he could not, among other things, due to the great scandal that had been unleashed.

Don’t miss out on reading: Chris Terrio, writer of Justice League, asked to be removed from the credits when he saw what Joss Whedon did